Lay Faculty Association : Phone (718) 539-6440  Email: layfacultyassoc1261@gmail.com © 2019 LFA Local 1261   
Top Ten Reasons for Joining the LFA: 1. We represent teachers, teacher assistants, school psychologists, librarians in an atmosphere of mutual cooperation with employers for the benefit for all. 2. We understand the Catholic and private school philosophies of education and support the right of workers to organize to improve their living standards. 3. You win the right to negotiate and approve a contract that improves and guarantees your wages, benefits, job security, and working conditions. 4. You can participate in the LITINA pension plan and other nationwide benefits. 5. You can be covered by the Mason Tenders District Council medical plan if you live in any of the four counties on Long Island. 6. You will have assistance in developing non-strike strategies to obtain a good contract. 7. You can take advantage of our money-saving LIUNA Union Privilege Program. 8. You will have access to the services of our attorney, field representatives, and organizers. 9. You will have the support of the 700,000 nationwide members of our parent affiliate, LIUNA, and of the entire AFL-CIO. 10. You will benefit from our expertise and proven ability to settle contracts peacefully. Your Legal Rights You have the legal right under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act to join or support a union and to: 1. Attend meetings and discuss joining a union 2. Read, distribute, and discuss union literature (as long as you do this in non-work areas during non- work times, such as during breaks or lunch hours). 3. Wear union buttons, T-shirts, stickers, hats, or other items on the job. 4. Sign a card asking your employer to recognize and bargain with the union. 5. Sign petitions or file grievances related to wages, hours, working conditions, and other job issues. 6. Ask other employees to support the union, to sign cards or petitions, or to file grievances. You have the RIGHT to form a Union: IT IS YOUR LEGAL RIGHT TO FORM A UNION. While teachers are forming a union at their school, it is not uncommon for administrators to violate your rights.  The following acts constitute a violation of the New York Public Employment Relations Board: 1. Attend any union meeting, park across the street from the meeting place or engage in any undercover activity which would indicate that the employees are being kept under surveillance to determine who is and who is not participating in the union meeting; 2. Tell employees that the school will fire or punish them if they engage in union activity; 3. Lay off, discharge or discipline any employee for union activity; 4. Grant employee wage increases, special concessions or benefits in order to keep the union out; 5. Bar workers who are organizing from soliciting other emplyees’ membership on or off the school’s property during non-working hours; 6. Ask employees how they intend to vote if a union election takes place; 7. Threaten employees with reprisal for participating in union activities.  For example, threaten to close the business, curtail operations or reduce employees’ benefits; 8. Promise benefits to employees if they reject the union; 9. Give financial support or other assistance to a union; 10. Announce that the school will not deal with the union; 11. Threaten to go out of business and reopen under another name to avoid dealing with a union; 12. Ask employees whether or not they belong to a union or signed up for union representation; 13. Make anti-union statements or act in a way that might show preference for a non-union employee; 14. Make distinctions between union and non-union employees while assigning overtime or other desireable work; 15. Purposely team up non-union employees and keep them apart from those supporting the union; 16. Transfer employees to different jobs on the basis of union affiliations or activities; 17. Choose employees to be laid off in order to weaken the union’s strength or discourage union membership; 18. Discriminate against union supporters when disciplining employees; 19. By nature of work assignments, create conditions intended to get rid of an employee because of union activity; 20. Fail to grant a scheduled benefit or wage increase because of union activity; 21. Deviate from a school policy for the purpose of getting rid of a union supporter; 22. Take action that adversely affects an employee’s job or pay rate because of union activity, including pension rights; 23. Threaten workers or coerce them in an attempt to influence their vote if an election is planned; 24. Threaten a union member through a third party; 25. Promise employees a reward or future benefit if they decide “no union”; 26. Tell employees extra-curricular activities will be discontinued if the school is unionized; 27. Say unionization will force the school to lay off employees; 28. Say unionization will do away with vacations or other benefits and privileges presently in effect; 29. Promise employees promotions, raises or other benefits if they get out of the union or refrain from joining the union; 30. Start a petition or flyer against the union or encourage or take part in its circulation if started by employees. Enforcing Your Rights Some employers try to prevent the workers from joining a union. The best way to encourage your employer to recognize your union and negotiate a fair contract is to build a strong organization where you work. If your employer violates the law, the union can help you file "unfair labor practice" charges with the National Labor Relations Board. The Labor Board has the power - backed up by the federal courts - to order an employer to stop interfering with employee rights, to provide back pay, and to reverse any action taken against workers for union activity. You can help protect your legal rights by: Keeping written notes of any incidents in which company officials or supervisors threaten, harass, or punish workers because of union activity Immediately report any such incidents to your organizing committee and the union staff. Your notes don't have to be worded a certain way, but you should include what was said or done, who was involved, where and when it happened, and the names of any witnesses.
Your Legal Rights to Organize
Lay Faculty Association Local 1261 Phone: (718)539-6440   Email: layfacultyassociation1261@gmail.com © 2019 LayFacultyAssociation 
Your Legal Rights to Organize
Top Ten Reasons for Joining the LFA: 1. We represent teachers, teacher assistants, school psychologists, librarians in an atmosphere of mutual cooperation with employers for the benefit for all. 2. We understand the Catholic and private school philosophies of education and support the right of workers to organize to improve their living standards. 3. You win the right to negotiate and approve a contract that improves and guarantees your wages, benefits, job security, and working conditions. 4. You can participate in the LITINA pension plan and other nationwide benefits. 5. You can be covered by the Mason Tenders District Council medical plan if you live in any of the four counties on Long Island. 6. You will have assistance in developing non-strike strategies to obtain a good contract. 7. You can take advantage of our money-saving LIUNA Union Privilege Program. 8. You will have access to the services of our attorney, field representatives, and organizers. 9. You will have the support of the 700,000 nationwide members of our parent affiliate, LIUNA, and of the entire AFL-CIO. 10. You will benefit from our expertise and proven ability to settle contracts peacefully. YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS You have the legal right under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act to join or support a union and to: 1. Attend meetings and discuss joining a union 2. Read, distribute, and discuss union literature (as long as you do this in non-work areas during non-work times, such as during breaks or lunch hours). 3. Wear union buttons, T-shirts, stickers, hats, or other items on the job. 4. Sign a card asking your employer to recognize and bargain with the union. 5. Sign petitions or file grievances related to wages, hours, working conditions, and other job issues. 6. Ask other employees to support the union, to sign cards or petitions, or to file grievances. You have the RIGHT to form a Union: IT IS YOUR LEGAL RIGHT TO FORM A UNION. While teachers are forming a union at their school, it is not uncommon for administrators to violate your rights.  The following acts constitute a violation of the New York Public Employment Relations Board: 1. Attend any union meeting, park across the street from the meeting place or engage in any undercover activity which would indicate that the employees are being kept under surveillance to determine who is and who is not participating in the union meeting; 2. Tell employees that the school will fire or punish them if they engage in union activity; 3. Lay off, discharge or discipline any employee for union activity; 4. Grant employee wage increases, special concessions or benefits in order to keep the union out; 5. Bar workers who are organizing from soliciting other emplyees’ membership on or off the school’s property during non-working hours; 6. Ask employees how they intend to vote if a union election takes place; 7. Threaten employees with reprisal for participating in union activities.  For example, threaten to close the business, curtail operations or reduce employees’ benefits; 8. Promise benefits to employees if they reject the union; 9. Give financial support or other assistance to a union; 10. Announce that the school will not deal with the union; 11. Threaten to go out of business and reopen under another name to avoid dealing with a union; 12. Ask employees whether or not they belong to a union or signed up for union representation; 13. Make anti-union statements or act in a way that might show preference for a non-union employee; 14. Make distinctions between union and non-union employees while assigning overtime or other desireable work; 15. Purposely team up non-union employees and keep them apart from those supporting the union; 16. Transfer employees to different jobs on the basis of union affiliations or activities; 17. Choose employees to be laid off in order to weaken the union’s strength or discourage union membership; 18. Discriminate against union supporters when disciplining employees; 19. By nature of work assignments, create conditions intended to get rid of an employee because of union activity; 20. Fail to grant a scheduled benefit or wage increase because of union activity; 21. Deviate from a school policy for the purpose of getting rid of a union supporter; 22. Take action that adversely affects an employee’s job or pay rate because of union activity, including pension rights; 23. Threaten workers or coerce them in an attempt to influence their vote if an election is planned; 24. Threaten a union member through a third party; 25. Promise employees a reward or future benefit if they decide “no union”; 26. Tell employees extra-curricular activities will be discontinued if the school is unionized; 27. Say unionization will force the school to lay off employees; 28. Say unionization will do away with vacations or other benefits and privileges presently in effect; 29. Promise employees promotions, raises or other benefits if they get out of the union or refrain from joining the union; 30. Start a petition or flyer against the union or encourage or take part in its circulation if started by employees. Enforcing Your Rights Some employers try to prevent the workers from joining a union. The best way to encourage your employer to recognize your union and negotiate a fair contract is to build a strong organization where you work. If your employer violates the law, the union can help you file "unfair labor practice" charges with the National Labor Relations Board. The Labor Board has the power - backed up by the federal courts - to order an employer to stop interfering with employee rights, to provide back pay, and to reverse any action taken against workers for union activity. You can help protect your legal rights by: Keeping written notes of any incidents in which company officials or supervisors threaten, harass, or punish workers because of union activity Immediately report any such incidents to your organizing committee and the union staff. Your notes don't have to be worded a certain way, but you should include what was said or done, who was involved, where and when it happened, and the names of any witnesses.